Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Preserving the Civil War, cont.

Now, here we go with question #6 of Benjamin J. Stein back in October 2003 in “The American Spectator”.

So, here goes:

What would the South have been like if slavery had ended peacefully, as a result of moral awakening in the South, instead of through a bloody war?


Might the situation of blacks in America be better today? Might there have been no segregation, no Klan, no lynchings?

I just finished reading the book Killing Lincoln: the Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever on my Kindle. The film "The Conspirators" follows this book closely; I now understand the movie much better. In fact, I plan to get the movie thru Netflix and watch it again.  I couldn't put the book down though. It's a must read for anyone interested in the Civil War.

Friday, March 16, 2012

US Civil War "What Ifs" cont.

Now, here we go with question #5 posed by Benjamin J. Stein back in October 2003 in “The American Spectator”. “Preserving the Civil War” was the title of his three page essay that asked ten questions about the beginning of the conflict, ramifications of this and that decision, and the 'what might have beens' of it all. I want to continue sharing it here:



5


How would America have been different if the South had won?
Does anyone really think slavery would still be a stain on humanity in 2003? What would have happened if Lincoln had just said, “Erring sisters, go in peace”? Would the North and South not have reconciled and been one nation again? There were mystic chords of memory, after all, to coin a phrase. Would they not have pulled the Union together eventually without bloodshed?

To me, Ben's questions beg others. How 'bout, as two separate nations how would the USA and the CSA have handled the war with Spain over Pacific islands? Or, what about WWI &II ?

You can go on and on...

Friday, March 2, 2012

Was it illegal for the South to break-away? Q #3

I'm reaching out here to the Civil War Researchers. I'm doing research for an ebook. I'd appreciate any info on Sunday battles. If used in publication, I'll of course cite you as a source. Email me at chris@greensblueandgray.com. Thanks in advance.

Now, here we go with question #3 posed by Benjamin J. Stein back in October 2003 in “The American Spectator”. “Preserving the Civil War” was the title of his three page essay that asked ten, most often, provocative, questions about the beginning of the conflict, ramifications of this and that decision, and the 'what might have beens' of it all. I plan to keep the article, and I want to continue sharing it here:

#3


"Why was it legal for the colonies to rebel against Britain but not for the South to rebel against the North?

Again, I assume slavery was and is horrible and disgusting and a crime against humanity. But it was legal under the U.S. Constitution, so why was it allowable to wage a moral crusade killing six hundred thousand men to end it and to compel the slave states back into the Union? If popular sovereignty and right to self-determination mean anything, why did they not mean something in North America? Clearly the South (most but not all of it) wanted to be separate. Why was war the response to popular sovereignty? Or did the Southern firebrands force it on the North? If so, could the North have walked away from the fight? And, again, I am convinced that slavery was thoroughly horrible. But so is war."